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Essential Oils Blog

Tag Archives: Oil of the Month

May Oil of the Month: Honeybell Synergy

honeybell essential oil synergy

Just in time for summer, we created an exclusive, luscious sweet synergy: Honeybell. This synergy blends some common and less common essential oils into an exquisite feast for the senses, and a truly unique experience.

 Honeybell brings you a fresh and fruity aroma, and a juicy, sparkling citrus bouquet with a bit of woody and herbaceous tones rounding it out. This synergy comes out of the bottle with a delicious burst of berry.

 

honeybell essential oil synergy

Honeybell’s Background:

Honeybell contains some favorite familiar oils such as Orange Sweet and Grapefruit Pink and Lime Steam Distilled. But we also wanted to add a little something extra special to make this synergy really pop, so we added Buchu, Cognac and Galbanum essential oils to finish this blend. Each helps to create an amazing symphony of scent.

With that in mind, here is little background on these three less common oils:

 

Buchu (Buchu Betulina)

Buchu is distilled from the dried leaves of a small shrub native to South Africa.

These leaves have traditionally been used to support a healthy urinary system and to ward off pests.[1] Steffen Arctander, an expert and author of natural  perfumery, wrote that Buchu is “primarily extracted into tinctures, oleoresins and other extracts for the pharmaceutical industry.”

Because only small amounts of Buchu are distilled into essential oil overall, it isn’t easily available for everyday use.[2] Arctander notes Buchu essential oil is “prized in small amounts in the fragrance and flavoring industries for its strong, pleasing scent of blackcurrant,” which he further describes as an aroma of “penetrating, tart berry.”

Buchu essential oil also has an important place in working with the spirit, and can be used to support a sense of stability, especially in situations that are uncomfortable and unfamiliar.[3]

 

Cognac (White Vitis Vinifera)

Cognac (one of the finest brandies), is created to very strict specifications, and named for the Cognac region of France. The white grapes used in Cognac are first fermented into wine, and then distilled twice before being placed in a wooden barrel to age much like whiskey. [4]

Cognac Essential Oil is distilled from the fermented grape tissue remaining in the barrel once Cognac has aged . This makes for a scent highly prized by high-end producers in the perfume and flavor industries.

Arctander describes Cognac Essential Oil as an “intensely strong, almost harsh-fruity, oily-fatty, yet green-herbaceous odour of outstanding tenacity and great diffusive power….rectified, it is used in flavors and perfumes to give “lift” and fresh-fruity natural notes in liquors, fragrances.”[5] Because Cognac has such a powerful and penetrating aroma, it’s only used in small amounts.

 

Galbanum (Ferula Galbaniflua)

Galbanum essential oil is distilled from a gum resin extracted from the stem of a large herb native to the Middle East and Western Asia.

The resin itself has been prized since ancient times for its therapeutic and spiritual benefits for wound care, skin issues and respiratory support.[6]

According to Valerie Worwood the Galbanum resin was “one of the ingredients in the anointing oil instructions given to Moses on Mt. Sinai.” Galbanum resin was also used by Hippocrates for its healing properties, and prized by physicians in the Middle East.[7]

Galbanum distilled into an essential oil is still prized today for perfume making. Arctander notes its odor is “intensely rich green, woody balsamic with a dry undertone.”  Only small amounts are required to bring the green note that Galbanum gives to a scent, because of the strength of the aroma.[8]

In aromatherapy, Galbanum essential oil is great for body (and mind) when used for skin care, respiratory ease, and to soothe the nervous system, especially with worry and nervous tension.[9] For the spirit, Joni Keim recommends using Galbanum to support a sense of stability and personal strength.[10]

 

Honeybell’s Benefits:

So, now that we’ve discussed what makes Honeybell so great, let’s talk about its benefits beyond the scent!

Honeybell is exceptionally soothing and relaxing, and can help lift your mood, or promote a positive outlook. Because it’s very calming to the senses, you can reach for Honeybell to help reduce worry and nervous tension.

When diffused, Honeybell helps boost your outlook with a sparkling scent, brightening your day.

honeybell essential oil synergy

 

Blending Honeybell:

Honeybell shines as a natural fragrance to uplift the spirits and soothe the senses. In addition to adding to your diffuser, or carrying with you in a personal aromatherapy inhaler, you can also add Honeybell to personal care products for luscious self care. Just add Honeybell at 1% dilution into your favorite carrier.

KidSafe®: No

Cautions: Not safe for pregnancy and nursing.

 

Here are some suggestions for using Honeybell to get you started:

Honeybell Body Wash

  • 18 drops Honeybell Synergy (or 9 drops per 1 oz carrier for 1% dilution)
  • 2 oz unscented, natural body wash

Add to a PET plastic squeeze bottle and shake hard to mix

 

Honeybell Lotion

Add to a PET plastic squeeze bottle and shake hard to mix.

 

Honeybell Solid Perfume

(from the enclosed Product Details Sheet)

Melt beeswax over a double boiler. Stir in carrier oil. Remove from heat. Stir in 20-25 drops of Honeybell Synergy. Pour into small tins or jars and cap tightly to cool.

 


Sources:

 

[1] Lawless, Julia. The Encyclopedia of Essential Oils: the Complete Guide to the Use of Aromatic Oils in Aromatherapy, Herbalism, Health & Well-Being. Fall River Press, 2014.

[2] Arctander, Steffen. Perfume and Flavor Materials of Natural Origin. Pathfinder. 1960.

[3] Keim, Joni, and Ruah Bull. Aromatherapy & Subtle Energy Techniques: Compassionate Healing with Essential Oils. CreateSpace, 2015.

[4] “Cognac (Drink).” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 17 May 2018, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cognac_(drink).

[5] Arctander, Steffen. Perfume and Flavor Materials of Natural Origin. Pathfinder. 1960.

[6] Lawless, Julia. The Encyclopedia of Essential Oils: the Complete Guide to the Use of Aromatic Oils in Aromatherapy, Herbalism, Health & Well-Being. Fall River Press, 2014.

[7] Worwood, Valerie Ann. The Complete Book of Essential Oils and Aromatherapy: over 800 Natural, Nontoxic, and Fragrant Recipes to Create Health, Beauty, and Safe Home and Work Environments. New World Library, 2016.

[8] Arctander, Steffen. Perfume and Flavor Materials of Natural Origin. Pathfinder. 1960.

[9] Lawless, Julia. The Encyclopedia of Essential Oils: the Complete Guide to the Use of Aromatic Oils in Aromatherapy, Herbalism, Health & Well-Being. Fall River Press, 2014.

[10] Keim, Joni, and Ruah Bull. Aromatherapy & Subtle Energy Techniques: Compassionate Healing with Essential Oils. CreateSpace, 2015.

April Essential Oil of the Month: Magnolia Flower

Meet Magnolia Flower!

While “Magnolia” may bring to mind that Grande Dame of stately floral trees that grace the South, this essential oil actually comes from another type of Magnolia, which is cultivated in China and Southeast Asia for its ornamental and aromatic beauty.[1]

April Essential Oil of the Month: Magnolia Flower

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Remember Last Month? Try this Kumquat Recipe!

Hello, Oil of the Month club members! Do you still have your Kumquat Oil? If you haven’t already used up this refreshingly bright and juicy treat, try this amazing recipe, perfect to send some happy vibes to your senses, while helping sweetly freshen your living space!

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March Oil of the Month: Kumquat

kumquat essential oil

Just in time for spring and summer, we have a refreshingly juicy offering for this Oil of the Month.

Meet Kumquat!

This little fruit with a funny name boasts a big personality and an awesome array of benefits.

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They’re back. Not just an Essential Oil of the Month anymore!

If you are part of our Oil of the Month Club, you know that those exclusive oils are only available from us temporarily. But sometimes those oils make such a big debut that we bring them back into our family for good! Say hello to our new additions: Bergamot Mint, Caraway Seed CO2 and Cubeb Essential Oils! Now, let’s get better acquainted with these newbies and learn some great recipes!

Bergamot Flower

Bergamot Mint Essential Oil

Bergamot Mint Essential Oil

Refreshing and calming, Bergamot Mint is known to provide emotional support and calm the mind. Its aroma is complex – lightly citrusy, fruity, and with a soft hint of mint, this oil smells slightly of lavender. Bergamot Mint Essential Oil originates from the United States and is extracted using steam distillation from the flowering tops of the perennial flowering Bergamot Mint plant (Mentha citrata). This oil is a great addition for a relaxing bath and is KidSafe!

Heavenly Serenity Bath Blend:

What you will need:

What you will do:

Just mix all together and add to the bath to soak your worries away!

Caraway Seed Flowering Plant

Caraway Seed CO2

Caraway Seed Essential Oil

Sourced from Poland and extracted using carbon dioxide from the seeds of the Caraway plant (Carum carvi), Caraway Seed CO2 is jam-packed with therapeutic properties. Also KidSafe, this is a treat for rye lovers! A whiff of this will remind you instantly of a loaf of fresh rye bread. It’s a great go-to for settling a queasy or crampy stomach, as well as providing a boost of energy when you’re feeling a little tired or lethargic. Plus, you can use it for skin and hair care; use it to balance and cleanse the skin, and for the hair, use it for clean and flake-free scalp!

 

Energy on the Go (personal aromatherapy inhaler blend):

What you will need:

Tummy Soothing Blend:

What you will need:

What you will do:

Gently massage this blend on your stomach to help soothe away discomfort.

Cubeb Essential Oil Recipe

Cubeb Essential Oil

Cubeb Essential Oil

Also called Java pepper, this essential oil is warming and has an enticing, wonderful woody and spicy scent. It originates from Indonesia and is extracted using steam distillation from the dried Cubeb berries of the Cubeb plant (Piper cubeba), which is a part of the pepper family. This oil is mainly comprised of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, meaning that it has properties that can be helpful for issues associated with swelling and body discomfort, due to overexertion or aging joints. It can also help with digestive issues and, when diluted with a carrier oil,  be massaged clockwise into the abdomen to bring relief from several “irregular” symptoms as well as from bloating. Cubeb can be used to help support a healthy immune and respiratory system during times of seasonal illnesses.

Relief Blend:

What you will need:

What you will do:

You can massage this into your lower abdomen to soothe menstrual discomfort or use it to relieve sore joints and muscles due to aging or overexertion.

We hope you enjoy these new oils as much as we do! Let us know in the comments below!

January Oil of the Month: Massoia Bark

Plant Therapy is all about making our customers happy and thinking outside the box. When the recent vanilla shortage left us without that sweet, buttery, decadent scent, we came up with Peru Balsam for December’s Oil of the Month. For January, we have a different yummyness (technical term).

Massoia Bark, whose botanical name is Cryptocaria Massoy or Massioa, is steam distilled from the bark of the Massoia tree. This exotic beauty comes to us from Indonesia.

Massoia Bark, whose botanical name is Cryptocaria Massoy or Massioa, is steam distilled from the bark of the Massoia tree.This oil is valued for it’s unique scent, which is perfume-like. It has a buttery, sweet scent. It reminds me of a pastry shop or cookie.

The main constituent within this essential oil is Lactone. It is what is responsible for the creamy, coconut-like aroma. The Lactone, a rare constituent in essential oils, is  also responsible for the irritation to the skin. Consequently, we do not recommend Massoia Bark for kids, nor for topical use. It is meant for diffusing and aroma only.

Click Here to download the Massoia Bark info sheet.

This calming and decadent essential oil is great for emotional needs and to pamper yourself.  It is not for little runny noses. It is not for cleaning. It is not for toenail problems. Massoia Bark is simply a great diffuser oil that works great while you are soaking in the tub, while you are dreaming of your next vacation, and while eating chocolates!

Here is a diffuser recipe for just such an occasion
If you are a member of Plant Therapy’s Oil of the Month Club, how have you enjoyed Massoia Bark? Let us know in the comments section!

December Oil of the Month – Peru Balsam

Vanilla is one of the most popular scents worldwide. That sweet, decadent ingredient is used in everything from foods to cosmetics to essential oils.

However, as you may recall from a recent blog post titled, “Vanilla, Vanilla, Where Art Thou? The Story Behind the Vanilla Bean Shortage,” we explained what has happened with the vanilla crop and the reason for the current worldwide shortage.

When we at Plant Therapy learned that we would no longer have that rich, sweet scent of Vanilla… well, it was a sad day.

Peru Balsam to the rescue!

The blog linked above also mentions another oil — Peru Balsam — which has been December’s Oil Of the Month.

Peru Balsam has that sweet scent;  a coconut, vanilla aroma that brings the joy back to blending. Like vanilla, it is calming and comforting. It is a quiet, happy scent that finds that child in you and makes you stop, close your eyes and take it all in.

Click Here to Download the Peru Balsam Info SheetThis special find smells heavenly, but does have some cautions. It is a good oil for diffusion, but if used topically we recommend keeping the dilution to 0.4%. That means, for application to the skin, it would be best in a blend. It can add that hint of something sweet that would go perfectly with Lemon, Sweet Orange, Yuzu, Lavender, Rose Absolute, Sandalwood, and of course any of the Cedarwoods (what doesn’t go with Cedarwood?).

Here is a wonderful diffuser blend that will help you relax, decompress and wind down.

Take 5 Diffuser Blend

3 drops of Peru Balsam Essential Oil

2 drops of Bergamot

1 drop of Lime

2 drops of Patchouli

Mix and add to the water in your AromaFuse Diffuser or personal diffuser.

November Oil Of The Month – Cubeb

The Oil of the Month is Cubeb!

Also called Java pepper, this essential oil is warming and has an enticing, wonderful scent. The herb and oil have long been used as an aphrodisiac and to create an intimate mood. It’s been mentioned in books as early as the 4th century. Now it is often used for blends to help in various situations, from soreness to massage. This essential oil is popular in use around Asia for its beneficial properties.

CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT PLANT THERAPY’S OIL OF THE MONTH CLUB. 

Cubeb’s botanical name is Piper cubeba, and comes from Indonesia. It is in good company. You may have also heard of the botanical name Litsea cubeba. This refers to May Chang, which is from a different pepper plant and has a lemony scent. Of course, we also have Black Pepper, which has the botanical name Piper nigrum, and comes from India. These are all lovely, useful oils — Black Pepper being the only KidSafe pepper essential oil that Plant Therapy carries. 

This peppery pleasure is extracted from dried berries of the plant using the steam distillation method. This oil is mainly comprised of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. This means that it has properties that can be helpful for issues associated with swelling and body discomfort, due to overexertion or aging joints. It can also help with digestive issues and diluted with a carrier oil  and massaged clockwise into abdomen may bring relief from several “irregular” symptoms and from bloating. Cubeb can be stimulating and supportive for proper digestion. It also helps with symptoms associated with menstrual issues, can help to alleviate congestion, and help to promote clear, unlabored breathing.

Cubeb would blend well with Lavender, Geranium, Cardamom, Cedarwood, Allspice, Clove, Ylang Ylang and Rosemary.

Questions about Cubeb — or any other essential oil? Email our staff of Certified Aromatherapists: Aromatherapist@planttherapy.com

 

A blend that you might enjoy trying containing Cubeb would be this one for legs and feet;

Achy Legs and Feet Gel

Mix well and massage a quarter size amount into each leg, foot area.

October Oils of the Month – Bergamot Mint and Caraways Seed CO2

It certainly was not a trick this month, but a treat! Plant Therapy sent out two products! Bergamot Mint and Caraway CO2 were the features for October.

Bergamot Mint is a KidSafe essential oil that might have a surprising scent to you. It smells similar to Lavender essential oil, with a touch of mint and citrus. Much of the research point to it being a relaxing and calming oil. Although in the Mint family, Bergamot Mint is a gentler oil and is KidSafe. It can be used for respiratory issues, congestion, sore muscles or joints due to over-exertion, and for nausea.This calming oil from India, distilled from leaves, would be great in DIY body care products such as lotions, soaps and in candles. It is cooling and soothing and a great choice as a balancing blend for agitated emotions.

The other feature this month Caraway Seed CO2, also KidSafe, is a treat for rye lovers! One whiff of this will remind you of a loaf of fresh rye bread. It is a warming and fortifying CO2. It can help settle a queasy or crampy tummy and would be great in a blend with Peppermint for such issues. Also, it would mix well with oils like Bergamot, Cypress or Balm Mint Bush for a respiratory blend.

You can use these two separately or you might want to try this recipe which could help with intestinal issues or congestion.

 

Tummy and Congestion Helper

4 drops of Bergamot Mint

3 drops of Caraway Seed CO2

10 ml Fractionated Coconut Oil (or carrier of choice)

Pour essential oils into an empty 10 ml roller bottle and then top off with carrier oil. Gently shake or tip back and forth to mix. Apply to the abdomen for nausea or chest for congestion.

We hope that you enjoy your double treat this month and put these to good use!

 

Download  Bergamot Mint Product Template Sheet HERE:

 

 

Download Caraway Seed Product Template Sheet HERE:

 

September Oil of the Month – Lemon Tea Tree

Get ready to rumble! Plant Therapy’s September Oil of the Month is a fighter. The relatively small tree/bush hails from Australia and grows well in the rainforest as well as on the dry rocky terrain. But it is also a champ because it will be in your corner and help you to feel your best, emotionally and physically.

This contender is best used in a  diffuser blend for a few reasons. It will send an uppercut to seasonal threats and a jab to foul odors as well. It will help you to focus and stay on task. This steam distilled essential oil has constituents that are known to stop some minor respiratory issues in their tracks. In a study at Charles Sturt University, Leptospermum petersonii, when diffused, was helpful in combating several types of organisms that can cause problems throughout the body. (1)

 

 

If you are guessing that this citrusy Australian essential oil is also a worthy opponent against tiny outdoor pests, you are right. You can diffuse for 30 minutes beforehand in the area that you are going to be at, and it will go the distance with these little challengers. You could also instead create a DIY outdoor candle. We’ve provided an easy recipe below for you.

Lemon Tea Tree is a strong oil, so be sure to use in small amounts so as to not irritate your skin. It is not a KidSafe oil. If used topically, we recommend a maximum dilution of 0.7%, which is about only 1 drop of the Lemon Tea Tree to 1 teaspoon of carrier oil. Of course, that 1 drop can be used in a blend with other essential oils, preferable non-citrus oils. A blend of essential oils such as Copaiba, Frankincense Frereana and Cypress would be great for sore joints. Whether you decide to apply topically or diffuse,  you’ll want this heavyweight in your corner.

 

Outdoor Candle

What you will need:

What you will do:

  1. Melt beeswax in a double boiler.
  2. Remove wax from heat and stir in Lemon Tea Tree.
  3. Carefully pour hot wax mixture into a canning jar, leaving ¼” space from the rim.
  4. Wrap 1” of the wick around pencil and place wick in wax, balancing dowel on the jar.
  5. Allow to cool.

 

Download Template Product Sheet HERE:

 

Sources:

(1)PubMed.com(2010)https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19952013

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