Essential Oils Blog

DIY Perfume

 

Essential Oils are used for practical purposes, but from time to time it is nice to be able to use them to make us feel good and smell good. Below are 3 recipes that Plant Therapy’s Certified Aromatherapists really enjoy. And for those of you who took advantage of Plant Therapy’s Day 5  Sale and received the perfume bottle as a free gift, you will love adding these to your recipe file.

 

Woodland Blooms

3 drops Mandarin Citrus reticulata

2 drops Cedarwood Himalayan Cedrus deodara

1 drop Jasmine Absolute Jasminum sambac

6 drops Polysorbate 20

Blend with 10 ml (1/3 oz) of witch hazel or alcohol such as vodka or rum.

 

Peaceful Spring

2 drops Sandalwood Australian Santalum spicatum

2 drops Neroli Citrus x aurantium

2 drops Bergamot Citrus bergamia

6 drops Polysorbate 20

Blend with 10 ml (1/3 oz) of witch hazel or alcohol such as vodka or rum.

 

Vanilla Orange Blossoms

3 drops Orange Blood Citrus sinensis

2 drops Vanilla Oleoresin Vanilla planifolia

1 drop Ylang Ylang Complete Cananga odorata

6 drops Polysorbate 20

Blend with 10 ml (1/3 oz) of witch hazel or alcohol such as vodka or rum.

 

The Philippines – In Search of Essential Oils

I recently had the opportunity to travel to the Philippines. It was an incredible experience, where I learned just how hospitable and kind the Filipino people really are. This was a trip that I was especially excited about because my mother has been serving a religious mission helping people with self reliance in Quezon City for the past 16 months and I hadn’t seen her during that time. She met me at the airport and accompanied me on my travels for the next two weeks.

A long flight seems longer when you are excited to see someone!

 

Finally here!

 

I arrived late at night and got around 4 hours sleep before heading back to the airport to catch our flight to Bacolod. We made the short drive to Bago City where we met the owner and founder of an herbal supplements company. They have recently moved into distilling essential oils and we wanted to see their process and facility. We experienced the freshly distilled local citrus fruits of Calamansi and Dalandan. They had also distilled some Elemi and Organic Eucalyptus.

Visiting a company that distills and checking out their essential oils. Quality always…

 

After a productive visit in Bago City, we drove across town to visit Auke, the founder of a 12-year-old lemongrass co-op called AID Foundation. They have a great vision of helping those in need, which is perfectly in line with ours at Plant Therapy. Many of the people of this region are very poor with limited means to produce income. Many only have access to two resources… time and land. AID Foundation employs agronomists that will go into these rural communities and teach the local people farming techniques and help them set up an operation where they can earn a living.

No, this is a not a blood bank above… It is a supply  of essential oils.  The bottom picture is of a still.  For some communities this is the key to their livelihood.

 

These are the specifics of a small lemongrass operation… They require roughly 25-30 families to participate if they want to have their own still. They will help the community get water using a ram pump- this is an incredible invention that can pump water uphill without the use of electricity. Once water is available they will plant 20,000 lemongrass plants on a hectare of ground- just under 2.5 acres. They can harvest the lemongrass plant every two months. It can be cut low and it will just continue to grow. The cut grass is then left to dry for two days before being placed in the still. 180 kg (400 lbs) of dry material is placed in the still and steamed for 3 hours. This will produce one kg (2.2 lbs) of pure lemongrass essential oil. The oil is then put into a one liter bottle and labeled with the farmer’s name, location, date, and batch number. The spent leaves are put into compost boxes and later returned to the farms as fertilizer. This is the only adjuvant that is added to lemongrass farms. Every few years they will rotate out the crop to grow some root crops like Ginger or Turmeric. The farmer’s all own the distillation equipment and get paid a certain amount of money for each batch of oil that is produced. The AID foundation then sells the lemongrass oil and uses any profits to help another community get set up. I love their mission, values, product and facilities. Unfortunately, we aren’t currently buying products from them because their prices are too high. It doesn’t make sense for them to lower them to the bulk market prices because that would defeat the whole purpose of the co-op, which is to help the farmers. In addition, we batch test every oil and it would be cost prohibitive to test the oil from every 2.2 lb batch. We are working on some ideas that will allow us to work these small artisan distilleries, so that is something I am excited about in Plant Therapy’s future.

Some beautiful Lemongrass fields handled with love and care.

 

The following morning, we flew out to Cagayan de Oro. We spent two days visiting small farms and a distillery there. Many of these rural farmers are living on less than $1 per meal for their family of 6-7. They are primarily eating rice. In fact, it appears that most Filipino people love their rice, consuming it 3 times per day. We ate it multiple times per day, every day of the trip. If you were to visit a KFC or McDonalds there you are going to be served rice. I was also told that if they don’t eat some rice, many don’t consider it an actual meal. One can eat pizza or a sandwich, etc. but without rice, it is just considered a “snack”.

We visited an oil distiller in Sitio Danao.

 

Most of these farmers are also part of a co-op using only organic farming methods. The farms are sprayed with neem oil (native to the Philippines), molasses, and beneficial fungi. When the crops are harvested, they are sold to the co-op which pays them on a per-pound basis.

Another precious yield of the Phillipines.

 

When we returned to Manila we were able to visit with some suppliers of both Virgin Coconut Oil (VCO) as well as Fractionated Coconut Oil (FCO). Plant Therapy is in a unique position within the FCO market. As you may or may not be aware, the vast majority of products being sold as FCO in the retail market are not made from coconuts at all. It is actually a palm oil that, when processed, resembles FCO. Even though most people can’t tell the difference, we will not sell something as coconut oil unless we are absolutely certain it is actually coconut oil. For that reason, we require proof from our suppliers that it is 100% coconut oil. We are the only company, that I am aware of, with that requirement.

Meeting with some of our suppliers of our wonderful Coconut Oil. We are one company that requires proof that our Coconut products are 100% coconut.

 

The Philippines is an incredibly beautiful country. During my time there we were also able to do many “touristy” type things. Including the following: Dahilayan Adventure Park, whitewater rafting, Zoobic Safari, American Cemetery, WWII battle sites, Underground River, a crocodile farm, weaving factory, Honda Bay tour, Starfish Island, Luli Island, Cowrie Island, Pagsanjan Falls, Taal Volcano, and Art in Island. It is a place I would love to visit again in the future to continue the pursuit of charitable and business opportunities there.

Taking time to play with Mom!

June Oil of the Month – Lemon Myrtle

An essential oil that is as lemony, if not more than Lemon? How can that be? Lemon Myrtle is incredibly lemony. Australians love Lemon Myrtle for many reasons and are very familiar with it. The leaves of this plant are dried and ground up for a spice and used in many delectable dishes. The leaves are also used in something interesting called “Bush Tucker”. Bush tucker or bushfood is various food that is native to Australia and is used by the original inhabitants for culinary and medical reasons, and also for sustenance.

Lemon Myrtle plant also packs a punch. The Rideal-Walker test estimates the antimicrobial activity of plants. The higher the score, the more effective the plant. According to this test, it scored Lemon Myrtle plant a 16, Tea Tree plant an 11, and Eucalyptus Citriodora plant an 8. Again, this speaks of the plant itself. We will be presenting the essential oil, which is highly concentrated and powerful.

Lemon Myrtle Essential Oil (Backhousia Citriodora) is an elevating beautiful scent that is no shrinking violet. It has some amazing properties. Even in small amounts, it is still a force to be reckoned with. It is great for deodorizing and cleaning DIYs, to battle occasional seasonal threats and to freshen a room. It can be helpful for conditions that can develop when feet are moist and warm too often. It also has been shown to be helpful in relaxing and uplifting. When diffusing, use just a small amount, as a little goes a long way. Due to its high citral content, we recommend a low dilution of under 0.7%.

Some essential oils that would go well with Lemon Myrtle are; Cedarwood Virginian, Sandalwood Australian, Fragonia, and Blue Cypress.

Here is a diffuser recipe to help you become acquainted with this lovely, fresh essential oil.

 

Diffuser Blend   – This is good for respiratory and is uplifting.  Of course this is just an example for an ultrasonic diffuser and you can modify to your liking and to your diffuser. This is not a KidsSafe® blend.

2 drop Lemon Myrtle (Backhousia citriodora)

4 drops Cedarwood Virginian (Juniperus virginiana)

2 drops Fragonia (Taxandria fragrans)

 

Download Product Template Sheet Here

 

Reflections of a Summer Lover

By Ellen Brenner, Certified Aromatherapist


Oh happy days are here!

I am a child of summer.  And, my inner child remains happiest in the season of the sun. This I have learned about myself.

Summer is when my spirit feels most buoyant and unbound. Joy is easier to access as it readily bubbles to the surface.

If winter is the hibernal season, and spring is of renewal, for me summer is a  season of sustenance.

Our mind, body and spirits are nourished by the abundance of sunshine and daylight, the refreshing array fresh fruit and vegetables, the heady scent of summer blooms, and the frequency of the dazzling dragonflies. For many, these beautiful, blessed dragonflies — whose magical beauty shimmers under the summer sun —  represent and remind us of the ability to reflect light for the greater good.

I arrived in this world as a native to perpetually sunny Southern California. Though I was born in December, it was as summer-like, bright, 85-degree-day.

Reflecting back, I realize my spirit has always sought the sun  ever since  to find and create summer for my soul wherever I happen to be.

As a child in Southern California there was joyful abandon playing outdoors and walking barefoot in the grass, especially with the heady scent of the orange groves at the end of our street.

Later, I lived by the beach there and spent every summer day of my teen-age years barefoot in the sand and jumping through the waves.

To this day, I prefer my feet unbound to feel more grounded. If I am not barefoot, then flip flops are the footwear of choice. From my perspective, you cannot have too many pairs.

In my early adulthood, I moved to the Midwest for work. That’s when I quickly realized I needed sunlight and warmth to feel vital and nourished. What I had taken for granted, now needed to be recreated. If it was going to take awhile for summer to come to me where I was, then I needed to go in search of  summer.

Winters breaks became tropical getaways to the Caribbean where the season of the sun was only a flight away.  Immediately upon arrival, my whole being was transported by the soft air, shimmering waters, and the sun in the sky. Not only did my body thaw, but any tension I carried immediately melted away.  Breathing in the sea breeze allowed me to clear the clutter in my head, returning back to real life with a sense of renewed clarity.

Later, I moved to New England with shorter winters, but also shorter summers. This meant ensuring that I savored every drop of summer while it was in season. I joined the tradition of spending idyllic long weekends on Cape Cod. Crossing that bridge from the mainland marked the point where I was able to let go of the go-go-go and relax into loafing.

Now, I live on the Gulf Coast of Florida. Another west coast for sunsets on the sea and walks on the beach framed by turquoise water and white sugar sand.  And, though actual summer  is a swelter, but most of the rest of the year we live in season as if it  is part of our daily life.  My challenge here is taking the time from daily life to enjoy living in paradise.

No matter where you live, and what your experience, you can always create your own summer for the spirit. Aromatherapy offers a natural opportunity to help create that buoyant and relaxed state of mind.   Even when you can’t break away to chase the sun, a sniff of the synergies evoking the sense of summer can transport you instantly to to a mini-break in your own mind’s eye.

For me, the sensory experiences of the summer season call for a switch to scents that are fresher and cooling  such as citrus and mints.

To help you get started, or to inspire you to create your own experiences, I offer below some summer loving synergies curated from my own collection to evoke favorite seasonal memories.

These were created for inhalation purposes to most readily connect with the mind and spirit. I prefer to make these in a personal inhaler to have with me when needed. You may also choose to use your diffuser, with the exception of the Beach Rose synergy because the rose otto 10% is diluted in vegetable oil, which can damage the unit.

 

I wish you an abundance of sun in your spirit!

 

Inner Child

This uplifting and cheerful blend helps restore my joy of the simple life on a sunny day during my childhood in Southern California.

2 drops Grapefruit Pink, Citrus x paradisi

2 drops Mandarin, Citrus reticulata

1 drop Spearmint, Mentha spicata

 

Mental Mojito

This refreshing and revitalizing scent helps when I need that sense of clear -headed clarity created after a Caribbean Vacation. 

3 drops Lime, Citrus x aurantifolia

2 drops Peppermint,  Mentha x piperita

 

Beach Rose  

This soothing scent is evocative of the slow days, sand dunes, and snow cones of Cape Cod where I crossed the bridge into a state of contentment and relaxation.

2 drops Rose Otto (Diluted at 10%)  Rosa damascena 

2 drops Sandalwood Australian, Santalum spicatum

1 drop BergamotCitrus bergamia

 

Sangria Siesta 

(for Inhalation)

This deeply relaxing and uplifting synergy is reflective of the lazy days of a Florida summer calling for loafing on the lanai for rest and reflection.

2 drops Davana, Artemisia pallens

1 drop Lemon, Citrus x limon

1 drop Lime, Citrus x aurantifolia

1 drop Orange SweetCitrus sinensis

Dandelion Infused Carrier Oil DIY

Spring is in the air and the Dandelions are once again popping their bright yellow heads out of the ground. Up until recently I have never looked at these pesky lawn ornaments as beneficial-only as the usual weed that I struggle to banish from my perfectly groomed lawn. But boy does my heart melt every single time my toddler brings me her gorgeous bouquet of freshly picked dandelions. I don’t dare throw them out and break her little heart – so random cups of water, with yellow blossoms floating in them litter my kitchen all summer long.

So what’s so great about these bouts of infestation consuming my luscious green grass? Fresh dandelions are beneficial for a variety of reasons. To my surprise, every part of a dandelion is useful including the flower, stem, roots and leaves. Dandelions are extremely beneficial for fighting bacteria and helping to heal wounds. They have been considered a natural food source for so long due to having a very high vitamin and mineral content (even higher than vegetables) and are used to decorate salads or to be eaten raw in many countries. You can boil them, or dip them in batter and fry them. Due to the fact that dandelions are such a sustainable plant and they are easily grown, they can be used year-round for a multitude of medicinal purposes.

The dandelion dates back to the early 1800’s and is said to originate in Europe, where they used to rid their lawn of the grass in order to make more room for dandelions and other “weeds.” The name “Dandelion” is an English corruption of the French name for this plant: “dent de lion” meaning “lion’s tooth”, a reference to the tooth-like serrations on the plant’s leaves.” (Ehrlich, 2015)

As for therapeutic properties, they are gentle, calming, and have pain relieving qualities that can be beneficial for muscle rubs and over-exertion balms. Dandelion infused carrier oil is perfect for beauty products or for topical applications due to its healing properties. It can also help reduce feelings of worry and is skin moisturizing. Dandelions are chock full of vitamins A, B, C, and D, are an appetite stimulant, and are great for upset stomach. Dandelions can also help with digestion and help fight inflammation.

Next let’s talk about how to make a Dandelion Infused Carrier Oil. First of all, there are different infusion methods you can use to extract the medicinal benefits of the Dandelion. There is the Solar-infused method, cold infusion method, and double-boiler method. This recipe is going to be for the cold infusion method.

Any carrier oil can be used for this recipe, the only thing you should keep in mind is the shelf life of the carrier oil – this will determine how long your dandelion infused carrier oil will last. I chose to use a blend of Camellia Seed Carrier Oil (12-18 months) and Fractionated Coconut Carrier Oil (2 years). Some excellent alternatives are Almond Carrier Oil, Argan Carrier Oil  or Jojoba Carrier Oil (which will extend the shelf life of the carrier oil).

Before you begin picking, always make sure the dandelions you are picking are free of pesticides and chemicals. When you go out to pick your dandelions make sure it is a bright sunny day and late enough in the afternoon that all the dew has evaporated. You want to pick enough of them to fill up your mason jar. Shake each individual flower head gently to evacuate any small inhabitants that may be living in them.

Once the jar is full, fill your mason jar with your choice of carrier oil until it covers the dandelions completely. You do not want your dandelions to be sticking out of the oil because the air and moisture can inhibit bacteria growth and lead to molding. Once they are completely submerged in the oil, stir gently to ensure all the air bubbles have been removed and place in a sunny window. You can cover the oil with a breathable mesh such as cheesecloth or a coffee filter to be sure no foreign objects fall into the oil while it is infusing.

 Let the oil sit, stirring every few days, for 2-3 weeks. Dandelions can be left in the window for up to 4 weeks if you choose to make the carrier oil more aromatic, but any longer could result in bacteria growth and mold. This method of infusion is called the “cold infusion method” because you do not use heat to extract the properties from the dandelion. Once the 2-3 weeks has elapsed, use a slotted spoon to remove the dandelion heads, then strain through a cheesecloth or fine mesh cloth to remove any small particles. Also, you will want to store the oil in a cool, dark place as you would any other carrier oil.  To calculate the shelf life of your dandelion infused oil take average of the shelf life your carrier oils have; for this particular recipe, it would be about 21 months.

When the oil is finished there are so many different DIY products you could use it for. It can be used to create an oil blend, salve, or butter for pain associated with age and over-exertion. It can be added to a lotion which would be beneficial for dry chapped skin. Making a facial toner is a great option as well, due to the inflammation and healing properties of the dandelions. Don’t forget that the carrier oil alone has added therapeutic properties, so making this dandelion infusion then becomes a powerhouse for therapeutic benefits.

Helpful Hints:
  • Always make sure the dandelions you are picking are free of pesticides and chemicals.
  • Only pick dandelions once the dew has evaporated on a warm sunny day.
  • Shake/tap gently to remove inhabitants.
  • Check your carrier oil for mold growth and air bubbles every couple of days while it is in the sunny window. (If you get a small patch of mold on one of the flower heads it should still be fine, but if there is too much you may consider throwing it out and beginning again.)
  • Store your dandelion infused carrier oil in a cool, dark place.
  • Label your container with the infusion date to ensure accurate shelf life.
  • Be sure to use clean, dry containers and utensils when preparing your dandelions for infusion.

 

“When you look at a field of dandelions you can either see a hundred weeds or a hundred wishes.”

– Unknown

 

References:

Ehrlich, S. D. (2015, June 22). University of Maryland Medical Center. Retrieved from Dandelion: http://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/dandelion

 

What do you like to infuse your carrier oils with?

Dill Weed Essential Oil

By Kimberly Daun, Certified Aromatherapist

 

I was super blessed to have had 4 enjoyable pregnancies, outside of the awful first trimester.  That first trimester I was constantly nauseous.  I know people crave odd foods when they’re pregnant, for me, the only thing I could keep down was pickles!  I remember one day when I was taking my 2 and 3 year olds to playgroup, I was sick but so hungry at the same time.  The thought of pickles made me salivate so I took a little detour and got the biggest jar of pickles the grocery store had.  I then sat in the car and proceeded to eat every single pickle, even drinking some of the juice!  I remember how shocked I was that not only did I keep it all down, but it helped to settle my stomach.  As I began learning about herbs and essential oils it made so much sense to find out that Dill Weed is one of the most recommended essential oils for an upset stomach.

Dill is such a great addition to any garden as it attracts ladybugs, who eat aphids, making it wonderful tool for organic gardening.  You can also harvest Dill leaves at any point during the year. I do container gardening yeararound (I often bring the containers inside during the winter) and my boys just love being able to pick off, eat, and enjoy the plants all year.  It helps to keep their digestive system balanced.  I also keep a roller bottle of Tummy All Better (which has a main ingredient of Dill Weed) for the upset stomach that often accompanies seasonal illness.  In ancient Greek and Roman Cultures, Dill was seen as a sign of wealth.  Soldiers would apply it to their wounds to help promote healing.  The Conqueror Charlemagne used to provide Dill on his tables to help those guests who may have indulged in a bit too much food at his banquets. [1]

To get the essential oil all aerial parts of the plant are steam distilled.  Plant Therapy currently sources our Dill Weed Essential Oil right here in the USA.  Although it is best known for digestive support there are many other uses.  It is helpful with head tension, ease symptoms associated with a normal menstrual cycle, and encourage restful sleep. [2]  Dill helps to calm, balance emotions, ground, and promote emotional harmony. [3]  My top five uses for Dill are:

Digestion

1 ounce Carrier Oil, 18 drops Dill Weed (massage on abdomen)

Massage on abdomenal area.

Sleep Diffuser Blend

2 drops Frankincense Serrata, 1 drop Dill Weed, 1 drop Lavender, 1 drop

Roman Chamomile

Head Tension

1 ounce carrier oil, 8 drops Peppermint, 6 drops Dill Weed

Massage on temples and down the back of the neck.

Menstrual Issues

Diffuse –  3 drops Palmarosa, 2 drops Dill Weed, 2 drops Ylang Ylang Extra  

Grounding Diffuser Blend

3 drops Cardamom, 2 drops Cedarwood Himalayan, 2 drops Dill Weed, 1 drop Patchouli

 

 

What do you use Dill Weed  Essential Oil for?

 

 

[1] World Healthies Foods, “Dill,” [Online]. Available: http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=71. [Accessed 27 December 2016].
[2] V. A. Worwood, The Complete Book of Essential Oils and Aromatherapy, Novato: New World Library, 2016.
[3] J. K. &. R. Bull, Aromatherapy & Subtle Energy Techniques, CreateSpace, 2015.

 

 

Immortelle Skin

 

Personally, I LOVE the smell of fresh coffee in the morning, so using this scrub in the shower before work gives me that extra boost I need to get up and going.  Plus, it smells delicious….and tastes good too! (Only because I accidentally got it in my mouth, but I DO NOT recommend eating my facial scrub!)

Growing up, I was blessed with blemish prone, oily skin and to this day I still struggle with occasional breakouts of pimples, blackheads, or clogged pores. I always thought that at the young age of 27 (okay, okay ….. 31) I would be over the pre-pubescent era and free of its evil clutches, but sadly many of us still suffer with some form of blemish our entire lives.

So, the challenge began. I needed to find something that would both clean and moisturize my skin without irritating it or drying it up. I tried countless over-the counter products, but they would either be too drying – which would cause my face to over-produce oil, in turn causing more breakouts (defeating the purpose), or too oily which would give me that too “shiny” look in pictures.

As I began working more with essential oils and carrier oils, I learned about the benefits of use and which ones are most effective in a given situation. Also, early in the testing stages, I found salt scrubs to be too abrasive for the sensitive skin on my face; which is why I decided to try a sugar scrub instead.

Initially, when I tried this scrub for the first time, my first thought (while I was rinsing it off) was, “Wow – this is wayyyyy too greasy!” But, after you towel dry and wipe off any excess oil, you will love the way your skin feels. Now that I have used it 3 times this first week, I cannot believe what it has done for my face. My pores feel tighter, my skin feels smoother, more hydrated, and for some reason, my everyday makeup just looks better.

Now before I give you the recipe, let me list some of the benefits of the ingredients I chose to use in this recipe:

Sugar – Sugar helps remove the outermost layer of dead skin and leaves your skin soft and smooth without causing pain or being too overly aggressive on the skin.

Coffee Grounds – The caffeine in coffee helps increase circulation, exfoliates, softens, and smooths skin.

Virgin Coconut Oil – This is the most versatile oil for the body and is extremely hydrating to skin.

Organic Moroccan Argan Oil – Argan is incredibly conditioning and known for its skin rejuvenating properties, rich in Vitamin E, and smooths fine lines and improves skin elasticity. Perfect for those prone to breakouts or those who have sensitive skin.

Near Perfection – This Carrier Oil Blend helps minimize the appearance of imperfections, is skin balancing, softens and conditions irritated skin, and contains Tamanu Oil, which extends to a wide range of natural treatments for blemishes and general oily skin.

Helichrysum Italicum – Also known as Immortelle, alleviates the appearance of bruising, rejuvenates the look of healthy skin, and helps reduce the appearance of fine lines, scars, and stretch marks.

Carrot Seed – Nourishes, rejuvenates, assists with healing,  and softening and smoothing to the skin.

Geranium Egyptian – Well known for the ability to help tone skin and revitalize complexion, and is very skin balancing.

Rose Absolute – Cooling, soothing, perfect for dry skin, helps minimize the appearance of scarring,  calming, and smooths skin.

Elemi – Rejuvenating, helps reduce the appearance of fine lines, skin supporting, and restores healthy younger-looking skin.

Organic Rose Hydrosol – Aids with blemishes, reduces redness, aids in removing dirt and oil in pores, and is safe for spraying directly on the skin. Hydrosols are also safe for children and pets alike.

Ingredients:

1 Cup Organic Brown Sugar

1/4 Cup Granulated White Sugar

2 Tbsp (Used) Coffee Grounds

1/4 Cup Organic Virgin Coconut Oil

1/4 Cup Organic Argan Oil

2 Tablespoons Near Perfection (Blend of Almond Oil, Jojoba Oil, Avocado Oil, Tamanu Oil, and Vitamin E)

Rose Hydrosol in a spray bottle

 

 

Essential Oils:

Helichrysum Italicum – 6 Drops

Carrot Seed – 6 Drops

Geranium Egyptian – 6 Drops

Rose Absolute – 3 Drops

Elemi – 12 Drops

Directions:

  1. Combine both sugars in a large bowl and mix together.
  2. Add all carrier oils to the dry sugar blend.
  3. Add all essential oils and mix thoroughly.
  4. Use no more than 3 times the first week – then use once a week to maintain a healthy glow.
  5. Use the Rose Hydrosol nightly as a facial toner.

For the Facial Scrub and Toning System I created, I recommend washing your face first, then using the scrub 1-3 times a week depending the needs of your skin.

Begin by gently wetting your face, then take about a quarter sized amount in your hands and gently massage your face with it for about 30 seconds to 1 minute. Rinse well and towel dry. Next, spray the Rose Hydrosol directly on your face (as a nightly toner) immediately following the scrub. You will feel a difference almost immediately; first with how smooth and hydrated your face feels, and then with how tight your pores start to look and feel. I promise you, this is a scrub you won’t want to live without!

For this recipe, I intentionally wanted to keep my essential oil dilution rate below a 1% since it will be used on the face and used frequently.

What are your morning routines that help put a “spring in your step”?

May Oil of the Month – Eucalyptus Dives

 

“Kookaburra sits in the old gum tree,

Merry, merry king of the bush is he,

Laugh, Kookaburra, laugh, kookaburra,

Gay your life must be!”

-Marion Sinclair

Maybe you sang this song as child, like I did,  but may not have been aware of which tree the words were referring to. This song refers to the great Eucalyptus tree-of which there are over 700 species, originating in Australia. Plant Therapy recently visited Australia and was able to see these wonderful trees up close-complete with Koalas!

 

 

There is a mountain range in Australia called “The Blue Mountains”. These mountains are covered with Eucalyptus trees and this is what one author had to share;

“The blue is not only the effect of distance but is also caused by the mountains’ characteristic blue haze. Their Eucalypt-dominated vegetation disperses fine drops of volatile oil into the atmosphere. The oil drops increase the risk of fire, perfume the air and scatter, with great visual effect, the blue light rays of the spectrum.”  (1)

Plant Therapy currently carriers two of the Eucalyptus varieties, Globulus and Radiata. For the month of May we are excited to feature Eucalyptus Dives as our Oil Of The Month. Many of you will be excited to know that you can have your Eucalyptus and use it on your kids too! Yes, this Eucalyptus is KidSafe.

I leaned about this at an essential oil conference I attended. An Australian oil expert took pity on me and my congestion at the time. I had experienced bronchitis a few weeks prior and although I was over the worst of it, I still had some residual effects. He took me aside, and said, “try this!” He then put several drops of Eucalyptus Dives on a tissue and told me to breathe it for a while. I did take a whiff of the tissue every few minutes for about 20 minutes, and then realized my lungs had relaxed and I quieted way down.  I was very excited to hear that we would be carrying this essential oil.

There are other qualities to love about Eucalyptus Dives as well. This refreshing, uplifting oil would be great in a sports blend to help with muscle or joint discomfort or  in a foot bath for those tired feet at the end of a day.  It would also be good diffused for seasonal threats and in a blend for cleaning.

 

Here is a recipe for you to try using Eucalyptus Dives:

Sports Master Blend (for sore muscles)

12 drops of Eucalyptus Dives

8  drops of Juniper Berry

6 drops of Roman Chamomile

6 drops of Marjoram

Blend together and use in a 3% dilution in your favorite Plant Therapy Carrier Oil for localized treatment or add 5-8 drops of blend to a diffuser or personal inhaler.

 

Download Product Template Sheet Here

 

Although many of us would love to go see the gum trees for ourselves in Australia, most of us will have to be content to enjoy Plant Therapy’s great Australian essential oils such as Eucalyptus Dives, Eucalyptus Globulus, Eucalyptus Radiata, Tea Tree, Australian Sandalwood, Fragonia, Kunzea, Blue Cypress, Balm Mint Bush, Buddha Wood, Boronia and last , but certainly not least, Rosalina.

I am grateful to Australia for the beautiful and beneficial essential oils that they produce. I am excited to learn about the latest Oil of the Month, Eucalyptus Dives, and to reap the benefits also. I feel it is a great addition to our collection and to yours.

 

Let us know how you use this essential oil and how it has benefited you!

 

___________________________________________________________________________

Sources:

(1) “The Greater Blue Mountains” area world heritage nomination

 

Balancing Our Whole Being

By Ellen Brenner, Certified Aromatherapist


In our last blog, “What Does Holistic Have to Do With Our Health” from the Essential Education series, we discussed the meaning and impact of of holistic health practices on our whole being. Essentially, we are caring for our whole person – bringing balance to mind, body, and spirit – for a restorative sense wellbeing.

We also discussed a specific self-care practice combining massage, hydrotherapy (through bath or shower) and aromatherapy to create a synergy for our senses. This allowed us to support our whole health at home in the tradition of Hippocrates, the Father of Western medicine, made modern by aromatherapy pioneer, Marguerite Maury.

Holistic health practitioners continue to incorporate another teaching of  Hippocrates:

 

Everyone has a doctor in him or her; we just have to help it in its work. The natural healing force within each one of us is the greatest force in getting well.”

To sustain optimal well being our mind, body and spirit consistently strive for balance. In Eastern Medicine and Energy Medicine, we think of balance in our natural energy flow. In Western Medicine, we think of this as homeostasis. This is the natural healing force within each of us.

Chronic disruption to our equilibrium can challenge our whole being beyond its ability to compensate and rebalance. This impacts our capacity to heal and can lead to dis-ease.

 

In addition, to the “aromatic bath and scented massage” as discussed in “What Does Holistic Have to Do With Our Health,” we have available to us many other self-balancing techniques from both ancient and modern traditions to incorporate into our self-care routines.

Because many of us experience nervous tension and worry that takes us out of balance, I’ve offered three options to help restore our mind, body and spirit in this situation.  I encourage you to  explore and experience what works best for you. Know you can begin with the mind, body or spirit after determining which area is of most concern, but each option can help to restore balance to our whole being.

All are designed as options for when we are on the go. We may not always have the time to be in a quiet space, but we can always create our own inner quiet space regardless of where we happen to be.

As always, aromatherapy can play a significant supporting role by creating a synergy with our other self-care practices. As we discussed previously, the intention of holistic aromatherapy is to help bring balance to mind, body and spirit to encourage our own natural healing process. With this in mind, we are going integrate aromatherapy with the practices below for a more expansive experience.

 

CALMING THE MIND

Experiencing meditation, along with aromatherapy, can help quiet our busy, repetitive, or anxious thoughts allowing us to balance the physical and subtle bodies. This also allows us to be in the present moment, go inward for introspection and hit the reset button.

Quiet Mind

This helps to quiet busy thoughts and expand our ability to go inward.

6 drops Basil Linolool (Ocimum basilicum)

6 drops Bergamot (Citrus bergamia)

3 drops Sandalwood (Santalum album)

Add to a personal aroma inhaler

 

Aromatic Meditation in Seven Simple Steps:

(Adapted from Yoga Journal June 2014) [1]

  1. Choose an aromatherapy blend and inhale deeply in each nostril. (see above)
  2. Find a quiet place to sit comfortably
  3. Gently close your eyes.
  4. Notice your breath, without trying to control it.
  5. Breathe gently through your nose and bring your focus to each inhalation and exhalation.
  6. Count each breath
  7. When you find thoughts coming to the surface, simply notice them like clouds floating by (without judgment) and return your attention to counting your breath.

 

 

RELAXING THE BODY

Manual tension release provides support for the physical body to relax and rebalance. This aromatic head massage, adapted from the ayurvedic experience, can relieve tight discomfort in the head and neck to create a cascade effect throughout the body helping to ease your mind, body and spirit back into a state of relaxation.

Heads Up

This is also helpful if you experience excruciating head and neck tension that can side-line you feeling unwell.

4 drops Peppermint (Mentha x piperita)

3 drops Marjoram, Sweet (Origanum majorana)

2 drops Basil Linalool (Ocimum basilicum)

2 drops Helichrysum Italicum (Helichrysum italicum)

2 drops Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia)

2 drops Rosemary (Rosmarinus Officinalis ct 1,8-Cineole)

Add to a 10 ml roller bottle and top with jojoba oil. Note, this is a 5% blend meant for spot treatment and short-term use.

 

Aromatic Ayurvedic Head Massage

(Adapted from Massage Bodywork Magazine Sept/Oct. 2008) [2]

  1. Apply your aromatherapy blend (see above) to your temples. Gently massage with your fingertips in circular pattern. Continue for at least one minute.
  2.  Next,  you may wish to apply a small amount of the aromatherapy blend to your fingertips.  Gently “shampoo” your entire scalp in small circles with your fingertips. Begin at the temples and move toward the back of the head. Continue for at least one-minute.
  3. Finish by gently “combing” the scalp with your fingertips. Begin with fingertips above the forehead, at the hairline, and comb over the top of the head and toward the neck and shoulders. Repeat up to 10 times

 

 

SOOTHING THE SPIRIT

Reflexology is the practice of bringing various aspects of the body back into balance by working through corresponding reflex points on the foot. These steps are intended bring our energy back downward from our head toward our feet soothing nervous tension felt in our physical and emotional bodies and regrounding us into a present calming state.

 

Balance Points

In practicing yoga, you become aware of centering your weight on the four corners of your feet so that your posture is in balance and you feel firmly balanced. This blend creates that sense of feeling squarely centered and grounded. 

2 drops Fragonia (Agonis fragrans)

2 drops Sandalwood (Santalum album)

1 drop Bergamot (Citrus bergamia)

1 drop Ginger CO2 (Zingiber officinalis)

Add to 1 oz unscented lotion.

 

Soothing Scented Reflexology Release

  • Apply only the smallest amount of lotion to cover the first foot, without being slippery.
  • Warm up the foot with gentle massage of the sole and top surface using gliding stroke with your fingertips and thumb.
  • Next, you are going to work with the Solar Plexus Point, known as the “panic button.”
  • The Solar Plexus Point is located just under the balls of your feet, in the very center of the two. Often you will feel tension when it is pressed.
  • Practice deep breathing by gently and slowly inhaling into the lungs and exhaling completely.
  • Gently press your thumb into this point and and circle in a clockwise direction until you feel a release of tension.
  • You may finish using both thumbs in a “diaphragm spread” by simultaneously pulling each thumb under the balls of the foot, from the center outward toward the edges.
  • Repeat other foot.

 


Sources:

[1] Quinn, Corina. “Reset Your Health.” Yoga Journal June 2014: 22. Print.

[2] Weber, Kristine Kaoverii., and Neil Sutherland. Healing Self-massage: Over 100 Simple Techniques for Re-energizing Body and Mind. London: Collins & Brown, 2005. Print. cited by  Smith, Laurie Chance. “Soothe Stress With Self-Massage || Massage Therapy Articles.”Massage Therapy: Everybody Deserves a Massage. Associated Massage and Bodywork Professionals, Sept. 2008. Web. 23 May 2017.