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Essential Oils Blog

All posts by Diane Mishler

A Field Trip

Some of us recently had the pleasure of taking a “field” trip to a Peppermint/Spearmint farm. It’s always fun to spend time with co-workers in a different environment and being outside in the sun, was an added bonus. We were in beautiful fields where Peppermint and Spearmint are grown for essential oil. Much mint is now grown in the United States. In fact the US is one of the largest producers of mint.

Naturally, we all had to pick some sprigs and smell the wonderful aroma of fresh-from-the-field mint. It’s so uplifting and invigorating. Chris Jones, the owner of Plant Therapy was there with his associates as well. They often personally go to farms where the oils are grown to check the quality of the plants and the practices of the farmers. They also like to look at the sustainability of the farms.

Chris Jones speaking to the farmer while the Peppermint distills

There is something about being in a field or garden that Is very grounding and pleasing to the senses. It brings one back to the earth and our dependence on it. We all were enjoying slowing down for a moment and learning about these wonderful, useful herbs. We know that Peppermint is strong and helpful with many things. In my opinion it is a must have, as it is great for physical issues as well as emotional.  Plant Therapy  has two Peppermint essential oils, from two different places in the world! One is grown in the US and the other is grown India.  Although they can address similar issues, they have a slightly different scent. 

Peppermint is cooling and can help sore muscles and joints, due to over exertion. It is better for a localized area, rather than a whole-body application. It is good for head and neck tension and congestion. I look at Peppermint with fondness, because it turned my husband from sceptical about essential oils, to someone who now asks me, “Can I use some of your Peppermint ? I have a headache.” Peppermint is useful for digestive issues and has calmed my tummy in many situations. Even just smelling it, has at times done the trick for me. It is also upliting and energizing. Peppermint essential oil is not a kidsafe essential oil, and we recommend that it be used on those ages 10 and up.

Peppermint is featured in many different synergies. Some of these are; DiGiZen, Brain Aid, Tingly Mint, Tension Relief, Respir-Aid, Zit Fighter, and our Muscle Aloe Jelly.

KidSafe Spearmint Essential Oil Mentha spicata is the the more subtle relative of Peppermint, and sometimes overlooked. but it too is a gem.  It also can help with tummy issues, head and neck tension and discomfort as well. But according to essential oil expert Robert Tisserand, Spearmint is a more sedating, while Peppermint is stimulanting. They are both uplifting, but in the evening I would be more likely to use Spearmint than Peppermint, if needed, so as to not keep me awake. I also love that Spearmint is KidSafe.

Some synergies with Spearmint are; Tummy All Better, Sniffle Stopper, Coco’s Blend and Tension Relief.

The finished product of Peppermint essential oil and hydrosol 

Any essential oil is very concentrated and requires a lot of plant material. In this case, it takes 1 acre of Peppermint to make  approximately 1 lb of essential oil!  This demonstrates just how powerful each drop can be.  As we watched the collecting of the plant material with a swather coils and pipes and huge vats doing there distillation magic, and then the finished product, we certainly had an appreciation for the hard work that goes into each little bottle. This is a precious and abundant crop that offers such versatility of uses.

 

What are your uses for Peppermint and Spearmint?

 

September Oil of the Month – Lemon Tea Tree

 

Get ready to rumble! Plant Therapy’s September Oil of the Month is a fighter. The relatively small tree/bush hails from Australia and grows well in the rainforest as well as on the dry rocky terrain. But it is also a champ because it will be in your corner and help you to feel your best, emotionally and physically.

 

This contender is best used in a  diffuser blend for a few reasons. It will send an uppercut to seasonal threats and a jab to foul odors as well. It will help you to focus and stay on task. This steam distilled essential oil has constituents that are known to stop some minor respiratory issues in their tracks. In a study at Charles Sturt University, Leptospermum petersonii, when diffused, was helpful in combating several types of organisms that can cause problems throughout the body. (1)

 

 

If you are guessing that this citrusy Australian essential oil is also a worthy opponent against tiny outdoor pests, you are right. You can diffuse for 30 minutes beforehand in the area that you are going to be at, and it will go the distance with these little challengers. You could also instead create a DIY outdoor candle. We’ve provided an easy recipe below for you.

Lemon Tea Tree is a strong oil, so be sure to use in small amounts so as to not irritate your skin. It is not a KidSafe oil. If used topically, we recommend a maximum dilution of 0.7%, which is about only 1 drop of the Lemon Tea Tree to 1 teaspoon of carrier oil. Of course, that 1 drop can be used in a blend with other essential oils, preferable non-citrus oils. A blend of essential oils such as Copaiba, Frankincense Frereana and Cypress would be great for sore joints. Whether you decide to apply topically or diffuse,  you’ll want this heavyweight in your corner.

 

Outdoor Candle

What you will need:

What you will do:

  1. Melt beeswax in a double boiler.
  2. Remove wax from heat and stir in Lemon Tea Tree.
  3. Carefully pour hot wax mixture into a canning jar, leaving ¼” space from the rim.
  4. Wrap 1” of the wick around pencil and place wick in wax, balancing dowel on the jar.
  5. Allow to cool.

 

Download Template Product Sheet HERE:

 

Sources:

(1)PubMed.com(2010)https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19952013

Sleep, Glorious Sleep!

 

 

2:00 am…2:20 am… 2:47 am ….

There’s nothing worse than experiencing a phase of sleepless nights. Sometimes it goes on for days, sometimes for months or years. There can be many reasons for lack of sleep. Everything from noise, exposure to electronic devices,  hormonal changes, stress, and worry. Whatever the reason, it can be very taxing and even affect your health.

Lack of sleep can cross barriers of cultures, age, and sexes, although research has shown that usually older adults experience it more and a greater number of women suffer from it than men.{1}

Some essential oils can be of help to some for falling asleep; being calming not only to the mind but also to the body. They can quiet busy thoughts and relax tense muscles. One needs to only diffuse a synergy such as Plant Therapy’s Sleep Aid, or Sweet Dreams or Nighty Night to feel your body relaxing and your mind letting go. My personal pick is Tranquil to help me wind down. Sometimes, it just a matter of getting a little extra help to get one to sleep, and then you are able to stay asleep.

Plant Therapy offers several blends formulated with sleep in mind, and there are excellent singles as well. There are so many different choices and I like to experiment with different essential oils in order to find the perfect blend to help me fall asleep and stay asleep. One blend I might diffuse includes Vetiver, Orange Sweet,  Chamomile RomanCedarwood Himalayan, and Frankincense Carteri. I would use amounts similar to this:

 

Just One Sleep Blend

1 drop of Vetiver Vetiveria zizanoides

2 drop of Orange Sweet Citrus sinensis

1 drop of Chamomile Roman Chamaemelum nobile

3 drops of Cedarwood Himalayan Cedrus deodara

2 drops of Frankincense Carteri Boswellia carteri

 

Here is a chart that Plant Therapy has put together to help you get some zzzzzs;

Download Sleep Chart HERE :

 

Sources;

({1}University of Maryland Medical Center, http://www.umm.edu/health/medical/reports/articles/insomnia

Carrier oils – The Other Part of the Equation

Carrier oils have become so exciting to me! I used to think of them as just oils used to dilute essential oils. But in reality, there is much more to them than that. Did you know that Argan Carrier Oil can help with scars and with the skin’s elasticity as well as to nourish the hair? Camellia Carrier Oil is great for mature skin, and to help when you’ve experienced sun damage…Rosehip Carrier Oil is rejuvenating to the skin, can be used on minor burns and wounds, and can be helpful for other skin issues. Some carrier oils like Jojoba (which is really a wax) and Meadowfoam can actually extend the shelf life of other carrier oils. Jojoba is also most like our natural sebum and is well received by our skin and rich in Vitamin E. Tamanu is one of the newest carrier oils that we have and one we are very excited about. This shimmery, thicker carrier oil  is amazing at helping with skin issues, irritations, and minor wounds.  It is best used in a blend because of it’s viscosity and strong scent.

We must remember that these carriers come from plants as well and have their own constituents. Although they are not concentrated like essential oils (which makes them very safe), they do have properties and characteristics of their own. They can determine how fast an essential oil will penetrate, depending on the viscosity of the carrier and how many Omega 9’s that they contain. Carrier oils can be blended as well, to create a synergy of their own and be helpful in adding to the benefits of an essential oil, when combined.

 

Correct storage is important with carrier oils because they are made up of fats, which can go rancid.  Most carrier oils, should be stored in the refrigerator.  The shelf life is much shorter than essential oils, so by all means use them up! Don’t save them for a special occasion or you’ll be missing out daily on the benefits of these great oils. If your oil is approaching a year in age, and you still have a full bottle then try using it as a cleanser or moisturizer. Then you can see which carrier oils agree with your skin type. Many have found the the Oil Cleanse Method to be beneficial for them.

It’s a personal decision whether to buy an expeller pressed, which is extracted by steam method, or a cold pressed carrier oil.  While cold pressed does retain more of the beneficial oils, there are benefits to steam distilling too. These beneficial properties can be acquired that didn’t exist without steam distillation, as in the case of fractionated coconut oil; fractionated coconut oil will gain more caprylic acid through steam distillation and in other carrier oils it will decrease the fatty acids.

We’ve created a chart that will be an easy reference for the single carrier oils that we currently carry.  It can help with the basic questions about carriers and will be helpful for a quick comparison regarding different common issues.

 

At Plant Therapy, we have an extensive, lovely selection of carrier oils.  Here is a list of the single carrier oils that we carry:

Amond Carrier Oil (Virgin, Sweet)

Apricot Kernel Oil

Argan Carrier Oil (Organic)

Avocado Carrier Oil

Camellia Seed Carrier Oil

Coconut (Fractionated) Carrier Oil

Evening Primrose Carrier Oil

Grapeseend carrier Oil

 Hazelnut Carrier Oil 

Hemp Seed Carrier Oil

Hemp Seed Carrier Oil  (Organic)

Jojoba (Golden) Carrier Oil

Meadowfoam Carrier Oil

Sunflower Carrier Oil (organic)

Tamanu Carrier Oil

 

Download Carrier Oil Chart HERE:

Carrier oil preferences are an individual choice and everyone has different skin types. We hope that you will explore carrier oils and their benefits.

 

Which carrier oil is your favorite?

 

References:

Price, Len and Shirley.  Carrier Oils for Aromatherapy and Massage. 

Worword, Valerie Ann.   The Complete Book of Essential oils and Aromatherapy.

When All is Said and Done, It’s Really an Individual Journey

 

Many people ask, “What is an essential oil that will be a foolproof treatment for….” Well, the truth is while there are generalizations, there are exceptions and what might work for one, might not work for another. That is to say, although some specific essential or blends have been successful in helping many, it’s not a guarantee that it will work for all. There’s more of a guarantee that there will be a few that it won’t work for.

When I discovered essential oils, years ago, I used them ignorantly and luckily didn’t become sensitized to essential oils or harm myself using them. Most of the time, they just sat on the shelf, because I didn’t know exactly what to do with them! Gradually, I began reading and researching and when I began working for Plant Therapy, a whole new world opened up for me. It was an aha moment as I became educated on safe methods and I learned just how effective and powerful that essential oils can be. I also learned more about the many constituents (the natural chemical compounds in oils) that essential oils contain. Not all of these chemicals or combinations are right for everyone. For instance, for children, there are safer, gentle oils that Plant Therapy recommends and we label them KidSafe® . For the elderly, Wintergreen or Cinnamon Leaf would not be my first choice, as they are strong oils with cautions. For some on medications, I might choose another oil than Chamomile German, which can have interactions with some medications.

Concerning myself, I have realized that I have a sensitive system, and some essential oil are better choices than others. So, while one oil, may be calming for someone, it may not be for me.  For many, Lavender is the definite choice when it comes to a calming oil. Although I love it and find it useful for many purposes, I don’t find it calming for my individual makeup. When the topic of scent comes up, we all have our druthers on which essential oils smell the best. Or I may have different preferences for blends addressing discomfort or skin issues than another. I absolutely love Vetiver, while others might find it unappealing. Others love the florals, and for me they are overpowering. I also love Chamomile Roman to calm and balance one’s system, and to help with swelling. Others, sadly, may not give it a chance because they don’t love the scent. The wonderful thing about essential oils though, is that they are multi-taskers and many address similar issues. So if you are wanting a calming essential oil, but aren’t crazy about the Chamomile Roman, don’t be discouraged. There are other options.  Some examples of other calming oils are; Bergamot, Orange Sweet, Cedarwood,  Patchouli, Vetiver and Melissa.

When someone says to me, “That essential oil doesn’t work.” I may smile just a bit, as I ponder that all of Plant Therapy’s essential oils are of the highest quality and have been tested several times to verify that. I like that a specific oil is not just tested once, and then those are the results that our customers will see forever, but every single batch of essential oils that comes into Plant Therapy is tested, so you know exactly what you are getting.  So, I know that although this person may not have found the perfect fit for them, it may be very effective for someone else’s body chemistry.  Also, it’s interesting that essential oils blended with other essential oils create a new synergy. It can be even more effective than if used alone. If someone doesn’t care for plain Lavender or Cedarwood Atlas, perhaps blending it with Orange Sweet or Bergamot, may make it your favorite oil blend ever.

Plant Therapy stands behind of it’s essential oils, and our customers can rest assured that if they are not 100% satisfied, they can receive a full refund, so there are no risks in purchasing an oil that you may not be sure that you will like. It certainly is a journey, and as we learn more and study each oil, and experiment a bit, we will find what works for us and how to use these precious substances to make our life better. Remember that like a lot of things, using essential oils is a journey, and oftentimes more enjoyable, when taking your time, learning along the way, and deciding what works best for your personal needs.

 

 

What Is the Big Deal About CO2’s?

 

There’s a new kid in town so to speak, and his name is CO2. Not many know a lot about him, but he’s here to make a name for himself.

CO2’s have surprisingly been around for decades, developed to be used within the food industry. We know that they have beneficial properties and qualities that can be used to our benefit when used topically or diffused. As they’ve grown in popularity and lowered a bit in price, more people have gotten to know about these exceptional extracts.

This extraction process differs from steam distillation, which is the most well- known method of extracting essential oils. With CO2 extracts, Carbon Dioxide  is pressurized until it’s a liquid. It is used as the solvent to remove the oil from the plant material.  With this solvent, there is no residue left behind,  and the precious oil is removed using much lower temperatures, so less properties within the oils are sacrificed.

“An easily perceived example of the difference between steam distilled and subcritical CO2 extraction is the comparison of the two types of extract of ginger (zingiber officinalis). Several of the pungent principles of ginger known as shagaols and gingerols only occur in trace amounts in the essential oil, where in the CO2 extract they are the major components…The cool temperatures of subcritical CO2 extraction also allow the collection of very volatile constituents which are lost in steam distillation. One of these constituents, hex-1-enal, gives the smell of freshly squeezed root ginger, and is found in subcritical CO2, but not in the essential oil.” [1]

 

There are some added bonuses to CO2’s.The smell is closer to the actual plant and to me, are crisp, clean scents. Essential oils can vary a great deal in the scent, dependent on things like climate, conditions, and each batch. With a CO2, they still can vary a bit, but they smell like what you expect them to. Turmeric CO2 smells like the spice turmeric. Lavender Fower CO2 smells like a field of lavender. The scent is very distinct and pristine.

Another benefit is they have a greater shelf life. As mentioned in one of Plant Therapy’s blog article,  “August Oil of the Month – Lavender Flower CO2“,  CO2s are longer lasting than essential oils.  Also, in many cases, CO2s require less oil when using topically as they are more powerful. A very little can go a long way. Here is an example; our Chamomile German, which we recommend diluting at a 2-3% dilution for use on the body. Our Chamomile German CO2 only takes the minute amount of 0.1%-0.2%, for topical application. Not all CO2s offer this dramatic a reduction, but many do require less.

CO2’s are an exciting new prospect. They are not to be jumped into head first, but researched and determined whether they are the best and safest choice for your needs. We always want to give our customers choices and options, whether it is regular essential oils, organic oils, KidSafe® oils, or CO2 extracts. We hope you will become acquainted with a CO2 today.

 

Reference;

[1] Bowles, Joy E. The Chemistry of Aromaherapeutic Oils. Allen & Unwin. 2014. Print.

 

August Oil Of The Month – Lavender Flower CO2

When I toured the Lavender farms in Washington recently, I learned that the extraction for Lavender essential oil is generally extracted and steam distilled from the buds because it produces more oil. But this precious oil is extracted from the open flowers using CO2 as the vehicle.

This lovely oil has a pure, beautiful floral scent, more like the actual plant. It has many of the same qualities as the Lavender that you know and love. It is still calming and relaxing as many of you know Lavender to be and it still can help with skin irritations and for facial blends. The difference with CO2s the scent is usually purer, vibrant and closer to the scent of the actual plant. Also, the temperatures in which the plant material is subjected to during the extraction process (using CO2) is much less, and so more of the beneficial properties can be obtained.  In this first batch of our Lavender Flower CO2, there are several components, not found in the essential oil, that Robert Tisserand says “make the CO2 extract much more long-lasting than the essential oil.”  It also picks up more of the respiratory constituents, camphor and 1,8 cineole.

 

Lavender Flower CO2  will be a wonderful addition to our Lavender family;

Lavender Lavandula angustifolia essential oil

Lavender Fine Lavandula angustifolia essential oil

Lavandin Lavandula x intermedia essential oil

Lavender Hydrosol

Lavender Aloe Jelly

Lavender Lotion

Lavender Body Cream

Lavender Set

If you are ready for the Lavender of Lavender oils, then Lavender Flower CO2 is for you. Here is a recipe that you can try.

Multi purpose blend (this can be used on blemishes, bug bites, minor scrapes and sore muscles too!)

3 drops of Lavender Flower CO2 Lavandula angustifolia

2 drops of Chamomile Roman  Chamamelum nobile

2 drops of  Bergamot Citrus bergamia

2 drops of Cedarwood Atlas Cedrus atlantica

10 ml of carrier oil or Aloe Vera Jelly

 

Download Product Template Sheet here.

A New Respect for Lavender

 

If you were on a game show, and they asked, “Name an essential oil.” I am sure that the host would say, “Survey says, Lavender!” Even if people have never used it, they probably have heard of it, or may even know that it is helpful for calming. It is in so many products, like soaps, body washes, shampoos, lotions, candles, ointments, and much more.

I recently had the opportunity to go to a Lavender festival in Washington state. I really don’t need much of an excuse to go near the ocean, but throw in a Lavender festival, and I had it booked 6 months ago! I apparently wasn’t the only one with the idea, for as we drew nearer, it took 2 hours to drive 16 miles. When I saw the first farm and Lavender field, I knew it was all worth it. The beautiful, straight, colorful rows were so overwhelmingly striking. My husband, being the great sport that he is, let me take it all in and patiently waited and listened to me go on and on. I walked through the romantic, perfumed, variegated fields of many varieties and colors and gained a greater appreciation for Lavender. I always valued this versatile essential oil, which was originally used in medieval times to ward off plague and disease (it’s a natural deterrent and kept the fleas at bay), but now I understood. I understood why it’s earned its place in the hearts of essential oil lovers.

Lavender is actually in the same family as mint. There are dozens of varieties of Lavender and it was a surprise to see the assorted colors. Pinks, Whites, Blues and many shades of the well-known Purple. There is even yellow Lavender. The flower heads varied a bit in appearance from variety to variety. The sterile hybrid of Lavender, called Lavandin Lavendula x intermedia is actually what is used for the “Lavender” scent in many products. Lavandin is a cross between true Lavender Lavendula angustifolia and Spike Lavender (Lavendula latifolia).  Lavender Essential Oil has more Esters, which is balancing and calming, and helpful with swelling.  Spike Lavender has more Oxides and also alcohol, which help with congestion, respiratory issues and for fighting seasonal threats. So Lavandin, has the qualities of both. We also have Lavender Fine, which is also Lavendula angustifolia, but a different variety grown in France and has a lovely softer scent.

The size of the plant also varied, from small compact shrubs to large, tall bushes. We toured about 6 farms, and each field was striking and almost as calming to view as the essential oil is itself. At B & B Farms in Sequim, WA, we were told that the biggest problem with growing Lavender, is over-watering and poor drainage.  He mentioned that the essential oil was extracted mostly from the unopened flowers, as this produced the most oil. He talked about that it took about a tote full of tightly compacted Lavender to produce just several ounces of essential oil. We saw as they sickled by hand the bunches of Lavender to be used for drying and how they bundled them and hung them in the barns to dry.

As we smelled that sweet, flowery scent wafting from farm to farm and I couldn’t help but think of Dorothy in the Wizard of Oz, lying down in the fields of flowers (albeit not Lavender) and going to sleep. I thought of its calming properties, how I have used it to help with muscle or joint pain. That it’s the first thing that I grab for a minor burn or bee sting. How it is good in cleaning products, body products and for skin issues.  It was a wonderful experience for a fan and student of essential oils. I’m grateful that I could go and that I could share it with our customers and Facebook members of our Safe Essential Oil Recipe group. Sometimes it’s easy to overlook old standbys when there are so many new, exciting essential oils coming out.   I feel that Lavender was put here to help us and benefit us and we would do well to learn more about it. I am including a couple of recipes that I hope you will like.

 

Oil Treatment for Hair

2 drops of Lavender or Lavender Fine

1 drop of Rosemary

1 drop of Cedarwood Virginian

1 ounce of Argan Carrier Oil

Mix well and apply to hair and leave on for 30-60 minutes and then wash out. This can be used on hair once a week.

 

Muscle and Mind Relaxing Massage Blend

8 drops of Lavender

6 drops of Copaiba

4 drops of Marjoram Sweet

4 drop of Bergamot

2 drops of Chamomile Roman

2 ounce of carrier oil ( I like our Marvelous Massage Carrier Oil Blend)

Blend well and store in a glass or PET plastic bottle.

 

July Oil of the month- Rhododendron

 

 

 

This month’s Oil of the Month comes from the remote Himalayan mountains of Nepal.  Although there are hundreds of varieties of Rhododendrons, this is the only variety that is non-toxic and the only one that can be distilled. The plant material from this very special plant has been known to be used by mountain climbers as a tea to help with their endurance.

Rhododendron Rhododendron anthopogon  is a beautifully soft, smooth scented essential oil and for me, it was love at first breath. It is good for issues such as tight and sore muscles and swelling. It is amazing for support to our immune system and for emotional support as well. It helps with congestion, respiratory issues, and tickly throats. It would go well in a diffuser to fight off seasonal threats.

It may be beautiful, but it’s not lazy! It also knows how to help around the house. It would be good in cleaning products and self-care products as well. You could make a DIY household cleaner or add to a shampoo, soap or body wash as well. It’s an essential oil with a cooling and moisturizing effect.

As I smelled Rhododendron, I could tell why it’s said that it can strengthen us emotionally and even give us courage. It can help with worry and sadness.

Rhododendron is a special treat and we hope you will reap the benefits of this essential oil.

 

Dreamy Body Wash

5 drops of Rhododendron Rhododendron anthopogon

4 drops of Bergamot Citrus bergamia

2 drops of Cedarwood Virginian Juniperus virginiana

2 drop of Roman Chamomile  Chamaemelum nobile

2 ounce of Castile Soap

2 tsp of Almond Carrier Oil

Mix well and put in pump bottle to use in shower.

 

Download Product Template Sheet Here:

 

 

 

 

 

June Oil of the Month – Lemon Myrtle

An essential oil that is as lemony, if not more than Lemon? How can that be? Lemon Myrtle is incredibly lemony. Australians love Lemon Myrtle for many reasons and are very familiar with it. The leaves of this plant are dried and ground up for a spice and used in many delectable dishes. The leaves are also used in something interesting called “Bush Tucker”. Bush tucker or bushfood is various food that is native to Australia and is used by the original inhabitants for culinary and medical reasons, and also for sustenance.

Lemon Myrtle plant also packs a punch. The Rideal-Walker test estimates the antimicrobial activity of plants. The higher the score, the more effective the plant. According to this test, it scored Lemon Myrtle plant a 16, Tea Tree plant an 11, and Eucalyptus Citriodora plant an 8. Again, this speaks of the plant itself. We will be presenting the essential oil, which is highly concentrated and powerful.

Lemon Myrtle Essential Oil (Backhousia Citriodora) is an elevating beautiful scent that is no shrinking violet. It has some amazing properties. Even in small amounts, it is still a force to be reckoned with. It is great for deodorizing and cleaning DIYs, to battle occasional seasonal threats and to freshen a room. It can be helpful for conditions that can develop when feet are moist and warm too often. It also has been shown to be helpful in relaxing and uplifting. When diffusing, use just a small amount, as a little goes a long way. Due to its high citral content, we recommend a low dilution of under 0.7%.

Some essential oils that would go well with Lemon Myrtle are; Cedarwood Virginian, Sandalwood Australian, Fragonia, and Blue Cypress.

Here is a diffuser recipe to help you become acquainted with this lovely, fresh essential oil.

 

Diffuser Blend   – This is good for respiratory and is uplifting.  Of course this is just an example for an ultrasonic diffuser and you can modify to your liking and to your diffuser. This is not a KidsSafe® blend.

2 drop Lemon Myrtle (Backhousia citriodora)

4 drops Cedarwood Virginian (Juniperus virginiana)

2 drops Fragonia (Taxandria fragrans)

 

Download Product Template Sheet Here

 


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